Wednesday, April 5, 2017

LOOK WHAT THE WIND BLEW IN


LOOK WHAT THE WIND BLEW IN
Dig Site Mystery #1
by Ann Charles

I have to confess: I know nothing about Hispanic culture. Food, of course—who hasn’t had nachos, salsa, pollo con arroz? And the only phrase I know in Spanish comes from the warning in New York City subway trains, advising the passenger that subway tracks are dangerous (just in case you didn’t know). And I visited Mexico once, for five minutes, when we were down in San Diego and I was curious and so we took the train to Tijuana—and then we promptly went back. I keep meaning to learn Spanish, because it’s a good language to know, but I haven’t gotten around to it. I’ve been busy. Yes, I’m embarrassed.

Anyway, so when I read Ann Charles’ Look What the Wind Blew In, I was intrigued and became curious about the history and the cuisine beyond the nachos, etc. The story is a mystery in an archaeological dig site in the Yucatan Peninsula (not that far from Cancun, where I also haven’t gone, even on vacation; I am a newbie about anything international unless it’s about Japan, unfortunately), and it’s also a bit of a romance, and a bit about the mythologies stemming from the Maya culture, which exists to this day. (Now Mayan is another language I’d be interested in learning, but I have a feeling I won’t get around to learning that, either. I’m feeling downright lazy.)

Anyway, I enjoyed the book. The locale is exotic, but fairly close to home! It’s about Angelica Garcia, an archaeologist in charge of the site, and Quint Parker, a photojournalist who arrives at the dig site, but he has an ulterior motive other than the article he claims he’s working on for a magazine. And you know when there’s an ulterior motive, there’s a secret or two that has to be ferreted out, and yes, there is. In fact, the ex-husband of the archaeologist then also arrives, and he’s got more secrets than a confessional. In fact, even the setting and scenery do, and that’s what I enjoyed most of all: the setting and scenery are characters in and of themselves, and it actually ADDS to the mystery and storytelling, not stopping it cold!

This story has a little of everything: mystery, romance, paranormal, anthropological culture, and description about cuisine. Even the CUISINE has an integral part to play in the story. I vaguely knew there was more to Hispanic cuisine beyond tacos, burritos, nachos, and salsa, but now…I demand to taste panuchos. I have no idea what they are, but I want to taste whatever delicious sauce that the Maya cook comes up with. People are getting hurt, threats are being made, but between the ceremonies (some involving blood) and cuisine, I found my anthropological roots being satisfied as well as my reader’s instincts.

Go read it. You won’t regret it.

Elizabeth MS Flynn has written fiction in the form of comic books, romantic fantasies, urban fantasies, historical fantasies and more (most published under the name of Eilis Flynn). She’s also a professional editor and has been for 40 years, working with academia, technology, and finance nonfiction, and genre fiction. If you’re looking for an editor, she can be found editing at emsflynn.com and reached at emsflynn@aol.com. If you’re curious about her books, check out eilisflynn.com. In any case, she can be reached at eilisflynn@aol.com.

1 comment:

  1. Thanks for this thoughtful review. I'll check out this book.

    ReplyDelete

 
ja