Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Thirteen Facts You Might Not Know About Daffodils


Did you know that many people believe daffodils symbolize hope? I’m with them. Golden petals inspire me.



Even though it’s April and the weather forecasters predict snow tomorrow, I’m excited because a few of my early daffodils are blooming. Daffodils are hardy. They’re one of the flowers that can withstand and even bloom in snow.  To me, that’s hope, which is probably why I’m a daffodil fan.
I’m betting you might be, too.  Here are thirteen other facts about them that you might not know.



1. Daffodils are part of the Amaryllis family. Sometimes they’re also called narcissus, jonquils and Lenten lilies.
2. But they’re mostly called Lenten lilies in Wales, where they are the national flower. In Wales, they say if you spot the first daffodil of the season, you’ll likely have a year that’s full of wealth. I wish the pictures of my daffodils have that effect for you.
3. Another rumor about daffodils is that they’ll bring good fortune if you receive a bunch of them.
4. But apparently if you’re given just one, it will bring you misfortune instead.
5. If you’re thinking about giving a bunch of daffodils, you should know that daffodils have a toxic chemical in their leaves and stems that can cause damage to other cut flowers you put them with.
6. This toxin, called lycorine, might be why deer and rabbits leave daffodils alone.
7. In addition, this toxin can irate a person’s skin. If this happens to you, you have a condition called daffodil itch. This hasn’t happened to me yet, even though I pick a lot of my daffodils. Hopefully, it won’t.
8. According to my sources, there are over 13, 000 different types of daffodils and they range in height from 6 to 20 inches in height.
9. Daffodils have leafless stems and each stem can have from one to twenty blooms.
10. Although most people grow daffodils from bulbs, the yellow flowers can also be propagated from seeds.
11. I’ve never tried growing daffodils from seed because I’ve found that if you leave the leaves after the daffodils have bloomed, the bulbs develop bulblets or little bulbs.
12. I also use bulb fertilizer because I really want more daffodils.
13. Several of my sources said that in Victorian times daffodils were a symbol of chivalry and that today gifts of daffodils are believed to ensure happiness.

That’s my wish for you. Please accept this virtual bouquet and we can share the happiness together.




Sources
http://3quarterstoday.com/2012/03/28/19-facts-about-daffodils/
http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/daffodil_facts/675/
http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/top10facts/392032/Top-10-facts-about-daffodils
http://www.countryliving.com/gardening/a35524/daffodil-facts/
http://quiltingpirate.blogspot.com/2008/04/thursday-thirteen.html



12 comments:

  1. They do not last long enough to suit me all 13,000 hahha

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  2. Yes, I wish daffodils would last longer, too, but I’m happy when they bloom anyway.

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  3. I always think of them as gold trumpets for a spring revelry and to open the tight lipped tulips. Our bed only blooms sparsely because big trees have grown and shade the sun.

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  4. So glad we're starting to see spring flowers -- I think you'll like my post for the day. My T13

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    Replies
    1. Me, too! And you're right. I do like your post.

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  5. Hmm. I think I need to start hunting around to find out if there is a DIY recipe for daffodil fertilizer. I love yellow-on-yellow daffodils and also Pink Lady.

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    1. Oh, I'll look for Pink Lady daffodils. Thanks.

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  6. Nice. The blogger gives me an arrangement of toxic flowers. Thanks a bunch, lady.

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    1. Sure anytime. Enjoy the toxic but lovely blooms.

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  7. I have never heard of daffodil itch. My daffys have come and gone, alas.

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    1. CountryDew,
      Wow, your daffodils are done? Lucky but also a little sad.

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  8. They remind me of home... my mother had many varieties of daffodils (or jonquils, as she also called them). I miss them...

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