Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Thirteen Reasons to Support Schools In Asia

Greetings Diners,
Thanks for stopping by.
When Mina told me about her mission to help children in Asia, a cause dear to my heart, I couldn't wait to have her visit the diner. Please give her your attention.

Growing up in Bangladesh, I have seen the poorest of the poor. Education and work training bring opportunities, which lead to a better life. Education gives you dreams and the means to make them real.
I'm passing forward the gift of education with my readers’ help by donating 50% of the proceeds of A Tale of Two Djinns to UNICEF's Schools for Asia. Here’s my personal blog post on why I chose to do donate. I hope together we will make a difference.


Here are 13 Reasons Why You Should Support Schools For Asia:

1.     Among the 67 million children who are currently not enrolled in school worldwide, 26 million of them live in the Asia-Pacific Region.
2.     The Schools for Asia campaign will help the most marginalized, excluded or otherwise vulnerable children, including girls and children from poor families and of ethnic minorities.
3.     Of the estimated total primary-age children that were not in school in 2005, 57 per cent were girls, and this may be an underestimate. (http://www.unifem.org/progress/2008/mdgsGender2.html)
4.     The initiative will operate in some of the most poverty-stricken countries -- Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mongolia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam.
5.     The Schools for Asia model is simple: Ensuring schools operate in the best interest of each and every child by providing young students with trained teachers and a safe, protective and inclusive learning environment.
6.     It’s a model that works. Schools for Asia follows the successful Schools for Africa campaign, which was launched in 2004 as an international fundraising partnership with the Nelson Mandela Foundation and the Peter Krämer Stiftung (foundation).
7.     The goal is not only to provide children with better and more accessible schools, but also, to keep them there.
8.     In 2009, thanks to UNICEF, 3.8 million children benefitted from school kits.
9.     Every dollar you donate adds up and makes a difference. According to UNICEF, every dollar you donate helps children around the world to grow up healthy, stay protected from harm and to go to school.
10. $250 provides “School-in-a-Box” kit containing basic education supplies for 80 children.
11. Lack of education can be tied to other important challenges such as maternal health, economic wellbeing, child labor, and human rights abuses.
12. Conversely, education can help promote gender equality, economic opportunities, and a more productive citizenry.
13. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), there are an estimated 21.6 million children, between the ages of 5 and 14 years, working in South Asia. Every child should have the opportunity to be a child.
Education does make a difference. It helped me discover my love of reading and writing. Thanks to my education I knew I wanted to a writer and I achieved that dream.  How has your education helped you?

Author Bio:

Mina Khan is a Texas-based writer and food enthusiast. She daydreams of hunky paranormal heroes, magic, mayhem and mischief and writes them down as stories. Between stories, she teaches culinary classes and writes for her local newspaper. Other than that, she's raising a family of two children, two cats, two dogs and a husband.

She grew up in Bangladesh on stories of djinns, ghosts and monsters. These childhood fancies now color her fiction. Her debut novella, THE DJINN’S DILEMMAwas published November 2011. A second novella, A TALE OF TWO DJINNS, came out March 2012. She had a lot of fun writing her djinn heroes.

You can find her at:

Facebook Author Page: http://www.facebook.com/Mina.Khan.Author


Blog: http://minakhan.blogspot.com/


A TALE OF TWO DJINNS BLURB:

Akshay, warrior prince of the earth djinns, earns the title of Crown Prince at a high cost when he loses his best friend in a battle against ancient enemies, the water djinns. Heartsick, he escapes to Earth to mourn.
Nothing gets the biological clock ticking (and elders lecturing) like almost dying in battle, so Maya,princess of the water djinns, travels to Earth for some no-strings-attached sex to fulfill her duty and produce an heir. But the beautiful and tough warrior gets more than she bargained for when she meets Shay.

Their not-so-simple one-night stand is interrupted by assassins and the world, as they know it, is changed forever. As Maya and Shay pull together to survive, both are determined to have their happily-ever-after and bring peace to their worlds — warring families, shadow assassins, and nosy busybodies be damned.

A TALE OF TWO DJINNS is available at Amazon,B& N, Smashwords and other places.

Excerpt:

Akshay wanted to charge in and claim her, but he hesitated as he remembered the look of horror plastered on Maya’s face just before she’d fled. He didn’t want to frighten her away. So he pulled in calming breaths and tried to tamp down the rage still swirling inside him like a hot desert wind. He needed to be calm, reasonable and persuasive. He needed her to stay. She lay on her stomach, clutching his pillow in her arms. Wary golden eyes watched him approach the bed. “You look like shit.”

Pulling on all his reserve, Akshay managed to stop a few feet from her. He touched the tenderness around his left eye and winced. Yeah, Jazz had landed a few good licks as well.
Quick as a serpent, that one. “It was a fair fight.”
“One you needn’t have had.”
“I guess I’m not as forgiving as you are.” No one, no one insulted his woman. He wasn’t an idiot. He knew she was hiding something and wished she’d trust him enough to share her secrets. But he loved her, and that meant accepting what she was ready to give. They stared at each other in silence as he tried to find the words to propose to her, ask her to share his life. Damn, he’d always known he’d marry someday…yet, he never expected to be this nervous. Truth be told, he’d never expected to feel anything other than resigned acceptance.

She sat up in bed and tugged her dress into place. “I’m well enough to travel now,” she said. “I’d appreciate it if you could have someone drop me off at a crossroad.”
Temper and misery flared at her words, ate at him in ravenous bites. He firmed his stance and
folded his arms across his chest to keep from grabbing and shaking some sense into her. “Prove it.”
“What?”
“You look like a tough gal, someone who could handle ruffians on the road,” he said. “You claim to be well enough to travel. Prove it and I will let you go with a clear conscience.” Never.
Maya clambered out of the bed, consternation knitting her brows. “How?”
“Beat me in friendly combat.”
Hope shone in her eyes. “If I win, I can leave?”
He nodded. “If I win, you stay.”
“You want a fight, you’ll get a fight.” A fierce grin lit her face, as she rolled and loosened her shoulders. “Bring it on.”
Heat and adrenaline rushed through Akshay, shot to his groin. Oh yes, he liked this woman. A woman with lean muscles and sexy curves, who wore her scars with pride and relished a good fight. A woman after his own heart. He sauntered toward the door and beckoned her with a wave. “Follow me.”




18 comments:

  1. Colleen,
    I think so too. Thanks.

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  2. Mina,
    Sure. I'm thankful that you want to help educate children. I do too. :)

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  3. Advocating for education is always an admirable cause, no matter the location. Good post!

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  4. Wow- I had no idea about a few of those facts.

    Have a great Thursday!
    http://harrietandfriends.com/2012/04/april-is-national-distracted-driving-prevention-month/

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  5. Thank you for sharing this. Education everywhere is important. It should be the first thing funded, not the last!

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  6. Thank you all for visiting & checking out my post. I totally agree education should be a priority every where.

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  7. Heather,
    You're right. Education is worthwhile anywhere.

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  8. I am Harriet,
    Yeah, it's cool to learn new facts. Thanks.

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  9. What a fabulous post! Thanks for sharing all this.

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  10. Great post. Education definitely makes a difference.

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  11. Very cool! These are appalling statistics, but I'm glad to know them.

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  12. Carolyn,
    Thanks. We appreciate your interest.

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  13. Forgetfulone,
    Yep, I think you're right about education.

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  14. Jennifer,
    Yeah, it's easy to appreciate why the children in Asia could use help. Thanks for stopping by.

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  15. Thank you all for your attention and kind words.

    Everyone has a part to play in this circle of life and, in the end, each and every action adds up and makes a difference.

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